rerum religionum. Studies in Religious Cultures

Religion is a cultural phenomenon that is manifested in art and society, law and ethos, language, consumer cultures, music and architecture. Any interpretation of late modern religion will therefore need to consider all these domains of contemporary culture. This applies especially to research on religion within and outside theology. Going beyond the traditional, polarizing focus on a disembedded subject or a set of dogmatic norms, religion needs to be seen as a dynamic performance of cultural practices.
Research in religion, theology, and cultural studies answers this challenge with specific approaches that examine and clarify boundaries, conflicts of interpretation, and battles over the assertion of worldviews. The question of cultural patterns of religion correlates with that of religious traditions, theological systematizations, and social ascriptions. Thus, discourses on religion have become the subject of empirical, philological, historical and comparative interdisciplinary research.
The volumes in this series reflect an understanding of religion as a cultural phenomenon that can be studied from semiotic, aesthetic and historical perspectives. With their different disciplinary backgrounds, the editors are particularly aware of the significance of research in this field.

The series is edited by Klaus Hock, Anne Koch and Thomas Klie.
Religion is a cultural phenomenon that is manifested in art and society, law and ethos, language, consumer cultures, music and architecture. Any interpretation of late modern religion will... read more »
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rerum religionum. Studies in Religious Cultures
Religion is a cultural phenomenon that is manifested in art and society, law and ethos, language, consumer cultures, music and architecture. Any interpretation of late modern religion will therefore need to consider all these domains of contemporary culture. This applies especially to research on religion within and outside theology. Going beyond the traditional, polarizing focus on a disembedded subject or a set of dogmatic norms, religion needs to be seen as a dynamic performance of cultural practices.
Research in religion, theology, and cultural studies answers this challenge with specific approaches that examine and clarify boundaries, conflicts of interpretation, and battles over the assertion of worldviews. The question of cultural patterns of religion correlates with that of religious traditions, theological systematizations, and social ascriptions. Thus, discourses on religion have become the subject of empirical, philological, historical and comparative interdisciplinary research.
The volumes in this series reflect an understanding of religion as a cultural phenomenon that can be studied from semiotic, aesthetic and historical perspectives. With their different disciplinary backgrounds, the editors are particularly aware of the significance of research in this field.

The series is edited by Klaus Hock, Anne Koch and Thomas Klie.

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