Music History on Stage

Starting with music theatre, the series Music History on Stage raises questions about the public, artistic and academic engagement with history, particularly with music history. Historical musicians, musical practices or artifacts have been represented in music theatre for centuries. Accordingly, operas, operettas or musicals about W. A. Mozart, Edith Piaf, Stradivari's violin or Riemann's Music Dictionary interconnect music, theatre and historical narrative.
Based on the findings of the corresponding Emmy Noether research group, the series Music History on Stage examines how (music) history is created and experienced. How may sound become a historiographical medium? In what ways do academic and popular music historiography interact? How does the production of music historical knowledge work in theatre?
Including perspectives from musicology, the history of knowledge, the history of science and humanities, public history, theatre studies and sound studies, the series analyses music history as a socio-cultural process, in which sound and sense, action and narrative, theory and practice interact. Music history on stage may hence be seen as an onset to exploring the role of music within the history of knowledge.

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The series is edited by Anna Langenbruch.
Starting with music theatre, the series Music History on Stage raises questions about the public, artistic and academic engagement with history, particularly with music history. Historical... read more »
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Music History on Stage
Starting with music theatre, the series Music History on Stage raises questions about the public, artistic and academic engagement with history, particularly with music history. Historical musicians, musical practices or artifacts have been represented in music theatre for centuries. Accordingly, operas, operettas or musicals about W. A. Mozart, Edith Piaf, Stradivari's violin or Riemann's Music Dictionary interconnect music, theatre and historical narrative.
Based on the findings of the corresponding Emmy Noether research group, the series Music History on Stage examines how (music) history is created and experienced. How may sound become a historiographical medium? In what ways do academic and popular music historiography interact? How does the production of music historical knowledge work in theatre?
Including perspectives from musicology, the history of knowledge, the history of science and humanities, public history, theatre studies and sound studies, the series analyses music history as a socio-cultural process, in which sound and sense, action and narrative, theory and practice interact. Music history on stage may hence be seen as an onset to exploring the role of music within the history of knowledge.

Homepage

The series is edited by Anna Langenbruch.

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