Documentary Practices. Excess and Privation

The interdisciplinary publication series of the Graduate Research Group on »Documentary Practices. Excess and Privation« examines the theory and history of documentary forms from the emergence of analog technology media in the 19th century to the digital media practices of the present. The series is guided by the following thesis: viz. that the specific authority of the documentary form can be described by way of investigation of the operations that – within the framework of various institutions and practices and in the manner particular to each of them – arrange visual, textual and audio media elements, in order thus to orient the readability, expressive value, distributive logics, and power effects of that which is documented. Different guiding concepts play a key role here: documentary 2.0, as contained in the various practices of self-documentation, like, for instance, in social media (neo-documentarism), and second-order documentary, which refers critically to the claims to objectivity and self-evidence of documentary truth claims and undermines them in a »counter-documentary« way.
The spectrum of the series brings together positions from the disciplines participating in the research group: media studies, literary criticism and comparative literature, and art history. In addition to monographs and collective volumes by the research group's participating scholars, the series serves, in particular, as a publishing forum for the group's young scholars to present their research approaches.
The series is edited by Friedrich Balke, Natalie Binczek, Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky, Oliver Fahle and Annette Urban.
Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) – GRK 2132.

The series is edited by Friedrich Balke, Natalie Binczek, Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky, Oliver Fahle und Annette Urban.
The interdisciplinary publication series of the Graduate Research Group on »Documentary Practices. Excess and Privation« examines the theory and history of documentary forms from the emergence of... read more »
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Documentary Practices. Excess and Privation
The interdisciplinary publication series of the Graduate Research Group on »Documentary Practices. Excess and Privation« examines the theory and history of documentary forms from the emergence of analog technology media in the 19th century to the digital media practices of the present. The series is guided by the following thesis: viz. that the specific authority of the documentary form can be described by way of investigation of the operations that – within the framework of various institutions and practices and in the manner particular to each of them – arrange visual, textual and audio media elements, in order thus to orient the readability, expressive value, distributive logics, and power effects of that which is documented. Different guiding concepts play a key role here: documentary 2.0, as contained in the various practices of self-documentation, like, for instance, in social media (neo-documentarism), and second-order documentary, which refers critically to the claims to objectivity and self-evidence of documentary truth claims and undermines them in a »counter-documentary« way.
The spectrum of the series brings together positions from the disciplines participating in the research group: media studies, literary criticism and comparative literature, and art history. In addition to monographs and collective volumes by the research group's participating scholars, the series serves, in particular, as a publishing forum for the group's young scholars to present their research approaches.
The series is edited by Friedrich Balke, Natalie Binczek, Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky, Oliver Fahle and Annette Urban.
Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) – GRK 2132.

The series is edited by Friedrich Balke, Natalie Binczek, Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky, Oliver Fahle und Annette Urban.
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