Good White Queers?

Racism and Whiteness in Queer U.S. Comics

How do white queer people portray our own whiteness? Can we, in the stories we tell about ourselves, face the uncomfortable fact that, while queer, we might still be racist? If we cannot, what does that say about us as potential allies in intersectional struggles? A careful analysis of Dykes To Watch Out For and Stuck Rubber Baby by queer comic icons Alison Bechdel and Howard Cruse traces the intersections of queerness and racism in the neglected medium of queer comics, while a close reading of Jaime Cortez's striking graphic novel Sexile/Sexilio offers glimpses of the complexities and difficult truths that lie beyond the limits of the white queer imaginary.

Overview Chapters

  1. Frontmatter

    Seiten 1 - 4
  2. Contents

    Seiten 5 - 8
  3. Acknowledgements

    Seiten 9 - 12
  4. 1 INTRODUCTION

    1.1 What to Expect in this Book: A Very Brief Overview

    Seiten 13 - 16
  5. 1.2 A Few Words on Formal Decisions

    Seiten 16 - 17
  6. 1.3 How I Came to Write this Book

    Seiten 17 - 20
  7. 2 THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS

    2.1 Why Comics?

    Seiten 21 - 39
  8. 2.2 Unequal Distributions of Power, Rights, and Resources

    Seiten 40 - 84
  9. 2.3 A Brief History of Intersectional LGBTIQ Politics in the U.S.

    Seiten 84 - 102
  10. 3 ALISON BECHDEL'S DYKES TO WATCH OUT FOR: A WHITE FANTASY OF A POST-RACIAL LESBIAN COMMUNITY

    3.1 A "Chronicle of Lesbian Culture and History"

    Seiten 103 - 106
  11. 3.2 A Multicultural Universe with Whiteness at Its Center

    Seiten 107 - 121
  12. 3.3 Armchair Anti-Racism: A Post-Racial Lesbian Community in a Racist Society

    Seiten 121 - 136
  13. 3.4 White Lesbians as a Better Kind of White

    Seiten 136 - 156
  14. 3.5 Political Consequences of Dykes' Armchair Anti-Racism

    Seiten 157 - 179
  15. 3.6 Conclusion: When Fantasy Is Read as Fact

    Seiten 179 - 182
  16. 4 HOWARD CRUSE'S STUCK RUBBER BABY: HOW 'GAY IS THE NEW BLACK' DISCOURSES SHAPE THE WHITE GAY IMAGINARY

    4.1 A Groundbreaking Work

    Seiten 183 - 185
  17. 4.2 A Window Seat to History?

    Seiten 185 - 188
  18. 4.3 'Gay Is the New Black:' A Dominant Discourse

    Seiten 189 - 191
  19. 4.4 Conservative Critiques

    Seiten 191 - 192
  20. 4.5 Common Intersectional Critiques

    Seiten 192 - 212
  21. 4.6 Further Intersectional Critiques

    Seiten 212 - 249
  22. 4.7 Conclusion: Stuck in a White Fantasy

    Seiten 249 - 252
  23. 5 JAIME CORTEZ'S SEXILE/SEXILIO: UNLEARNING HOMONATIONALISM AND DEVELOPING ALTERNATIVE DISCOURSES

    5.1 "Decentering Whiteness"

    Seiten 253 - 255
  24. 5.2 Disidentifications with Homonationalist Discourses

    Seiten 255 - 286
  25. 5.3 Centering Resilience

    Seiten 287 - 296
  26. 5.4 By Way of Conclusion: Reading Sexile/Sexilio from a Place of (Relative) Privilege

    Seiten 296 - 298
  27. 6 CONCLUSION: THE LIMITS OF WHITE LGBTIQ SELF-REPRESENTATIONS

    Seiten 299 - 304
  28. List of Works Cited

    Seiten 305 - 332
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20 April 2021, 332 pages
ISBN: 978-3-8394-4917-2
File size: 29.73 MB

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Kai Linke

Kai Linke, Berlin, Deutschland

Author(s)
Kai Linke
Book title
Good White Queers? Racism and Whiteness in Queer U.S. Comics
Publisher
transcript Verlag
Pages
332
Features
40 SW-Abbildungen, 1 Farbabbildung
ISBN
978-3-8394-4917-2
DOI
10.14361/9783839449172
Commodity Group
1726
BIC-Code
JFSK JFSL FZG AKLC
BISAC-Code
SOC012000 SOC031000 LIT017000
THEMA-Code
JBSJ JBSL1 AKLC1
Release date
20 April 2021
Topics
Geschlecht, Medien, Rassismus
Readership
Gender Studies, Queer Studies, Critical Race Studies, Critical Whiteness Studies, Comics Studies, American Studies
Keywords/Tags
Comics, Racism, Whiteness, Queer Theory, Sexuality, Gender, Media, Comic, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies

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